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Paul Cézanne

A lifelong struggle to capture the intensity of life

January 19, 1839October 22, 1906

A lifelong struggle to capture the intensity of life

"Painting certainly means more to me than everything else in the world. I think my mind becomes clearer when I am in the presence of nature. Unfortunately, the realization of my sensations is always a very painful process with me. I can’t seem to express the intensity which beats in upon my senses. I haven’t at my command the magnificent richness of color which enlivens Nature…Look at that cloud; I should like to be able to paint that! Monet could. He had muscle." — Cézanne on painting

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A certain ennui is always with me, and when I forget my sorrow for a moment it’s because I’ve had a drink.

Letters between Paul Cézanne and Émile Zola

1860
Antoine Dominique Sauveur Aubert

Antoine Dominique Sauveur Aubert

1866
Rocks in the Forest

Rocks in the Forest

1865-1868
Bathers

Bathers

1870
The Fishermen (Fantastic Scene)

The Fishermen (Fantastic Scene)

1875
Bathers

Bathers

1875
Still Life with Jar, Cup, and Apples

Still Life with Jar, Cup, and Apples

1877
Still Life With Fruit Dish

Still Life With Fruit Dish

1879-1880
The Gulf of Marseilles Seen from L'Estaque

The Gulf of Marseilles Seen from L'Estaque

1885
Mont Sainte–Victoire and the Viaduct of the Arc River Valley

Mont Sainte–Victoire and the Viaduct of the Arc River Valley

1885
Portrait of Madame Cezanne

Portrait of Madame Cezanne

1885
Mont Sainte-Victoire with Large Pine

Mont Sainte-Victoire with Large Pine

1887
Still Life with Apples and a Pot of Primroses

Still Life with Apples and a Pot of Primroses

1890
Boy in a Red Waistcoat

Boy in a Red Waistcoat

1888-1890
Still Life with Apples and Pears

Still Life with Apples and Pears

1891-1892
The Basket of Apples

The Basket of Apples

1890-1894
The Card Players

The Card Players

1890-1895
Lac d'Annecy

Lac d'Annecy

1896-1896
Mont Sainte-Victoire Seen from the Bibemus Quarry

Mont Sainte-Victoire Seen from the Bibemus Quarry

1897

Nature has more depth than surface, hence the need to introduce in our vibrations of light, represented by reds and yellows, enough blue tints to give a feeling of air.

Letters from Paul Cézanne to Emile Bernard

1904
Still Life with Flower Holder

Still Life with Flower Holder

1905
1801
The worst painter of the 19th century
Lawrence Alma-Tadema
A freed slave tells stories in quilts.
Harriet Powers
Paul Cézanne
Ghosts, madness, and the blood-soaked end of feudalism
Tsukioka Yoshitoshi
Anthropology or exploitation? Portraits of the Māori
Gottfried Lindauer
2000

The artists of Post-Impressionism

Read Sartle's snappy biography of Cézanne

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