Political Works

Migration Series No.27: Many men stayed behind until they could take their families north with them

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.28: The labor agent sent south by northern industry was a familiar presence in the Black communities

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.29: The labor agent recruited unsuspecting laborers as strike breakers for northern industries

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.2: The war had caused a labor shortage in northern industry. Citizens of foreign countries were returning to their native lands

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.30: In every southern home people met to decide whether or not to go north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.31: The migrants found improved housing when they arrived north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.32: The railroad stations in the South were crowded with northbound travelers

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.33: Letters from relatives in the North told of the better life there

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.34: The Black press urged the people to leave the South

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.35: They left the South in great numbers. They arrived in the North in great numbers

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.36: Migrants arrived in Chicago, the gateway to the West

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.37: Many migrants found work in the steel industry

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.38: They also worked on the railroads

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.39: Railroad platforms were piled high with luggage

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.3: From every southern town migrants left by the hundreds to travel north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.40: The migrants arrived in great numbers

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.41: The South was desperate to keep its cheap labor. Northern labor agents were jailed or forced to operate in secrecy

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.42: To make it difficult for the migrants to leave, they were arrested en masse. They often missed their trains

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.43: In a few sections of the South leaders of both Black and White communities met to discuss ways of making the South a good place to live

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.44: But living conditions were better in the North

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.45: The migrants arrived in Pittsburgh, one of the great industrial centers of the North

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.46: Industries boarded their workers in unhealthy quarters. Labor camps were numerous

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.47: As the migrant population grew, good housing became scarce. Workers were forced to live in overcrowded and dilapidated tenement houses

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.48: Housing was a serious problem

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.49: They found discrimination in the North. It was a different kind

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.4: All other sources of labor having been exhausted, the migrants were the last resource

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.50: Race riots were numerous. White workers were hostile toward the migrant who had been hired to break strikes

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.51: African Americans seeking to find better housing attempted to move into new areas. This resulted in the bombing of their new homes

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.52: One of the most violent race riots occurred in East St. Louis

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.53: African Americans, long-time residents of northern cities, met the migrants with aloofness and disdain

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.54: For the migrants, the church was the center of life

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.55: The migrants, having moved suddenly into a crowded and unhealthy environment, soon contracted tuberculosis. The death rate rose

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.56: The African American professionals were forced to follow their clients in order to make a living

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.57: The female workers were the last to arrive north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.58: In the North the African American had more educational opportunities

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.59: In the North they had the freedom to vote

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.5: Migrants were advanced passage on the railroads, paid for by northern industry. Northern industry was to be repaid by the migrants out of their future wages

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.60: And the migrants kept coming

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.6: The trains were crowded with migrants

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.7: The migrant, whose life had been rural and nurtured by the earth, was now moving to urban life dependent on industrial machinery

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.8: Some left because of promises of work in the North. Others left because their farms had been devastated by floods

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.9: They left because the boll weevil had ravaged the cotton crop

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Napoleon I on his Imperial Throne

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, 1806

Natal Where Art School Is

John Ndevasia Muafangejo, 1974

No More Games

Benny Andrews, 1970

Olympia in War Time: Royal Army Clothing Depot

Clare Atwood, 1918

One Day I Happened to See a Ruler

Ibrahim El-Salahi, 2008

Peace Halting the Ruthlessness of War

Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller, 1917

Petition to Congress for Women's Right to Vote

1873

Portrait of Brigadier Abenova

Aisha Galimbaeva, 1984
More Themes in Art

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