Tempera

Serpent of Wisdom

Nicholas Roerich, 1924

Power of the Caves

Nicholas Roerich, 1925

Proun 99

El Lissitzky, 1923-1925

Tidings of the Eagle

Nicholas Roerich, 1927

Cavalli

Giorgio de Chirico, 1930

Elijah the Prophet

Nicholas Roerich, 1931

Saint Panteleimon the Healer

Nicholas Roerich, 1931

Issa and the Skull of the Giant

Nicholas Roerich, 1932

Kuan-yin

Nicholas Roerich, 1933

Tibet, Himalayas

Nicholas Roerich, 1933

Zvenigorod

Nicholas Roerich, 1933

From Beyond

Nicholas Roerich, 1936

Blind Singer

William H. Johnson, 1940

Migration Series No.1: During World War I there was a great migration north by southern African Americans

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.2: The war had caused a labor shortage in northern industry. Citizens of foreign countries were returning to their native lands

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.3: From every southern town migrants left by the hundreds to travel north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.4: All other sources of labor having been exhausted, the migrants were the last resource

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.5: Migrants were advanced passage on the railroads, paid for by northern industry. Northern industry was to be repaid by the migrants out of their future wages

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.6: The trains were crowded with migrants

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.7: The migrant, whose life had been rural and nurtured by the earth, was now moving to urban life dependent on industrial machinery

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.8: Some left because of promises of work in the North. Others left because their farms had been devastated by floods

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.9: They left because the boll weevil had ravaged the cotton crop

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.10: They were very poor

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.11: Food had doubled in price because of the war

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.12: The railroad stations were at times so crowded with people leaving that special guards had to be called to keep order

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.13: The crops were left to dry and rot. There was no one to tend them

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.14: For African Americans there was no justice in the southern courts

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.15: There were lynchings

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.16: After a lynching the migration quickened

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.17: Tenant farmers received harsh treatment at the hands of the planter

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.18: The migration gained in momentum

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.19: There had always been discrimination

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.20: In many of the communities the Black press was read with great interest. It encouraged the movement

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.21: Families arrived at the station very early. They did not wish to miss their trains north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.22: Migrants left. They did not feel safe. It was not wise to be found on the streets late at night. They were arrested on the slightest provocation

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.23: The migration spread

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.24: Their children were forced to work in the fields. They could not go to school

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.25: They left their homes. Soon some communities were left almost empty

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.26: And people all over the South continued to discuss this great movement

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.27: Many men stayed behind until they could take their families north with them

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.28: The labor agent sent south by northern industry was a familiar presence in the Black communities

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.29: The labor agent recruited unsuspecting laborers as strike breakers for northern industries

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.30: In every southern home people met to decide whether or not to go north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.31: The migrants found improved housing when they arrived north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.32: The railroad stations in the South were crowded with northbound travelers

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.33: Letters from relatives in the North told of the better life there

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.34: The Black press urged the people to leave the South

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.35: They left the South in great numbers. They arrived in the North in great numbers

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.36: Migrants arrived in Chicago, the gateway to the West

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.37: Many migrants found work in the steel industry

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941
More Art Mediums

Pencil

Terracotta

Lithography

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