MOMA, Museum of Modern Art

Couple, Harlem

James Van Der Zee, 1932

Family Portrait, II

Florine Stettheimer, 1933

Landscape

André Breton, 1933

Large Still Life with Coffeepot

Giorgio Morandi, 1933

Retrospective Bust of a Woman

Salvador Dalí, 1933

Ornamental Gargoyle, Chrysler Building

Margaret Bourke-White, 1934

Portrait of Gala

Salvador Dalí, 1935

Rotorelief 1 (Optical Disks)

Marcel Duchamp, 1935

Rotorelief 2 (Optical Disks)

Marcel Duchamp, 1935

My Grandparents, My Parents, and I (Family Tree)

Frida Kahlo, 1936

Object

Méret Oppenheim, 1936

The Nymph Echo

Max Ernst, 1936

Debris of an Automobile Giving Birth to a Blind Horse Biting a Telephone

Salvador Dalí, 1938

Study for a Painting

Ad Reinhardt, 1938

Study for a Painting

Ad Reinhardt, 1938

Untitled

Ad Reinhardt, 1938

Argula

Arshile Gorky, 1939

Fulang-Chang and I

Frida Kahlo, 1937-1939

Study for a Painting

Ad Reinhardt, 1939

Study for a Painting

Ad Reinhardt, 1939

The Furniture of Time

Yves Tanguy, 1939

Blind Singer

William H. Johnson, 1940

Collage

Ad Reinhardt, 1940

Newsprint Collage

Ad Reinhardt, 1940

Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair

Frida Kahlo, 1940

Children

William H. Johnson, 1941

Migration Series No.2: The war had caused a labor shortage in northern industry. Citizens of foreign countries were returning to their native lands

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.4: All other sources of labor having been exhausted, the migrants were the last resource

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.6: The trains were crowded with migrants

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.8: Some left because of promises of work in the North. Others left because their farms had been devastated by floods

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.10: They were very poor

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.12: The railroad stations were at times so crowded with people leaving that special guards had to be called to keep order

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.14: For African Americans there was no justice in the southern courts

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.16: After a lynching the migration quickened

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.18: The migration gained in momentum

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.20: In many of the communities the Black press was read with great interest. It encouraged the movement

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.22: Migrants left. They did not feel safe. It was not wise to be found on the streets late at night. They were arrested on the slightest provocation

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.24: Their children were forced to work in the fields. They could not go to school

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.26: And people all over the South continued to discuss this great movement

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.28: The labor agent sent south by northern industry was a familiar presence in the Black communities

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.30: In every southern home people met to decide whether or not to go north

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.32: The railroad stations in the South were crowded with northbound travelers

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.34: The Black press urged the people to leave the South

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.36: Migrants arrived in Chicago, the gateway to the West

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.38: They also worked on the railroads

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.40: The migrants arrived in great numbers

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.42: To make it difficult for the migrants to leave, they were arrested en masse. They often missed their trains

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.44: But living conditions were better in the North

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.46: Industries boarded their workers in unhealthy quarters. Labor camps were numerous

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941

Migration Series No.48: Housing was a serious problem

Jacob Lawrence, 1940-1941
Featured Collections

Uffizi Gallery

Obelisk uses cookies to measure site usage, helping us understand our readers' interests and improve the site. By continuing to browse this site you agree to the use of cookies. Learn more