ObeliskPaul Gauguin

Two Tahitian Women

Two Tahitian Women, 1899, Paul Gauguin
Two Tahitian Women, zoomed in
94 cm72.4 cm

Two Tahitian Women is a Symbolist Oil on Canvas Painting created by Paul Gauguin in 1899. It lives at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The image is in the Public Domain, and tagged Women and The Nude in Art. SourceDownload

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As Gauguin brought his work in Tahiti to a close, he focused increasingly on the beauty and serene virtues of the native women. In this painting, he depended on sculpturally modeled forms, gesture, and facial expression to vivify the sentiments he had used to describe the “Tahitian Eve": “very subtle, very knowing in her naïveté” and at the same time “still capable of walking around naked without shame.” These two figures first appear in the artist’s monumental frieze Faa Iheihe (Tahitian Pastoral) of 1898 (Tate, London) and again in the even larger Rupe Rupe (The Fruit Harvest) of 1899 (Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow), which he composed for the upcoming Exposition Universelle of 1900.

Reed Enger, "Two Tahitian Women," in Obelisk Art History, Published March 14, 2015; last modified May 05, 2021, http://arthistoryproject.com/artists/paul-gauguin/two-tahitian-women/.

Further reading atmetmuseum.org
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