Trivium Art HistoryEdgar Degas

Self Portrait with Fedora

Self Portrait with Fedora, 1858 — Edgar Degas,
21 cm16.2 cm

In this self-portrait a young Edgar Degas turns his head to look out at the spectator. He wears casual clothes, including an open collar and broad brimmed hat. The informal, extreme close-up view of Degas's face and his impassive, almost sullen expression echo the unpretentiousness of his clothing. The small-scale, informal presentation and lightness of touch emphasize the intimacy of this image and the still-tentative character of the young artist. 

Around 1857, when he was twenty-three or twenty-four, Degas traveled to Italy, where he spent much of his time making copies afterRenaissance masters. The period was one of self-education and he drew prolifically, writing in one of his notebooks, "I must thoroughly realize I know nothing at all; it is the only way to get ahead." Finding in himself a willing sitter, he made fifteen or more self-portraits in various media during his time in Italy.

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