Trivium Art HistoryArt History Projects

Our imperfect memoryWhat do we remember and why?

Objectives

1. Visually study an artwork of your choosing

Works of art are often experienced in the moment. A painting might surprise us with it's texture or a sculpture may mesmerize with its illusion of motion. But how we remember artwork is also important. Some details stick in our brains, and some barely register. Choose an artwork to study for ten minutes. Look carefully at all the aspects of the image: line, color, composition, subject matter, and the emotions it conveys. Ten minutes is a long time. While you're looking, think about questions like these:

Once you've studied the artwork for ten minutes, stop looking at it, and don't look at it again until part two of the assignment. Take at least two hours away from the image. Once this time has passed, choose one of the following methods to share your memory of the artwork:

2. Choose one project below

Write

Write a 1 page description of the formal characteristics of the artwork you studied. What themes or figures are illustrated and how did the artist compose them? What emotions did you experience while studying the image? Do you think the artist intended to communicate these feelings?

 

Once your description is complete, look at the original artwork, and write a note about what elements of the artwork you forgot, and why you think you forgot them.

Draw

Draw a recreation of the artwork. Don't aim for perfection; represent the artwork as you remember it. Add 5 annotations highlighting the elements you feel were the most important to experiencing the artwork. Write a sentence about what made each highlight memorable.

 

Once your drawing is complete, look at the original artwork, and write a note about what elements of the artwork you forgot, and why you think you forgot them.

More Projects

All Projects

Imagined autobiography

An artist's most pivotal moment

A Study in Composition

You'll want a ruler for this one

A Memorial to Yourself

Like a tombstone, but better

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